Outline

One Way to Beat Writer’s Block: Find the Interesting in Every Scene

One Way to Beat Writer’s Block: Find the Interesting in Every Scene

I have found that writer’s block can be beaten with something as simple as finding the interesting in every scene that make up your story. It will always be easier to write when feeling intrigued by what you create. In this blog post, I will therefore show you a simple way to beat writer’s block by finding the interesting in every scene of your story.

NaNoWriMo Week 1: Lessons Learned

NaNoWriMo Week 1: Lessons Learned

So, NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) started on Sunday last week. All of you are probably too busy writing until your fingers bleed (or something a little less dramatic) than to read this, but I thought I would publish a blogpost a week concerning NaNoWriMo. The posts won’t be long, just a short list of what I’ve learned during the week while participation in NaNoWriMo. These blogposts will surely be filled with highs and lows, but that’s just a part of a creative process, right?

Anyway, here is a list of what I learned this week — and other general thoughts!

Get to Know Your Characters with Character Interviews: 115 Questions

Get to Know Your Characters with Character Interviews: 115 Questions

To be able to intrigue a reader, the most important thing is to have great characters. Characters should live, feel, express, and act like real people to be seen as genuine. Therefore, it’s important to get to know your characters as much as possible to be able to portray them as genuine as possible. A great way to get to know your characters is to ask questions about them and answer as honestly as possible from their perspective. That’s why I’ve created a list of questions below. Use as many or as few as you want and get to know your characters more closely. Use the questions as you would in an interview. I personally find this easier to get into the heads of my characters.

Worldbuilding Questions to use When Outlining Your Story: 10 Questions to Consider

Worldbuilding Questions to use When Outlining Your Story: 10 Questions to Consider

No matter if you create a story within a real or fictional place, you need to know some things about your chosen place to create an as genuine setting for your story as possible. As a means of help you can use some of the questions below when developing your story. Write down the name of your chosen place at the top of a paper (physical or virtual) and use the questions below as a guide to explore your chosen place. Use them as a means to brainstorm, do research, or just to get inspiration.

How to Outline Your Book with ”What if” Questions: Use These 4 Steps

How to Outline Your Book with ”What if” Questions: Use These 4 Steps

Every story begins with an idea (an event, a scene, a character, a setting, a theme, etc.), and most ideas begin with a question and a sense of curiosity. Most of those questions start with ”What if…”.

”What if…” questions can vary in a million different ways. They can ask questions about the plot, scenes, characters, and everything else that constructs a story. There are no limits.

Perhaps not all stories begin with these ”what if…” questions articulated, however, most stories are ultimately inspired by questions like these.

Begin Crafting Your Book with Pre-Outline Questions: For Fiction and Non-Fiction

Begin Crafting Your Book with Pre-Outline Questions: For Fiction and Non-Fiction

When you create a story you usually begin with a general idea. Perhaps you have a certain character in mind, a specific setting (real or fictional), a conflict, a theme, etc. No matter what you start off with, that general idea needs to be developed. That’s where the pre-outline questions come in. Answering the pre-outline questions that follow will help you to establish what you want with your book, what you want your book to be, in some bigger strokes what kind of plot you want to have, what kind of characters you want to write about, etc. For those of you who write non-fiction, you will get to answer questions about your niche and develop ideas from that.

An Introduction to Outlining Your Story: 6 Reasons Why You Should

An Introduction to Outlining Your Story: 6 Reasons Why You Should

Outlining is a matter of debate among authors — both aspiring and professional. Some say it kills the creative experience and process of writing the story from start to finish, some say it’s a lifesaver. If you are new to writing and/or the concept of outlining, you might want to know what an outline is, why you should outline your story, and how?