Author

Get to Know Your Characters with Character Interviews: 115 Questions

Get to Know Your Characters with Character Interviews: 115 Questions

To be able to intrigue a reader, the most important thing is to have great characters. Characters should live, feel, express, and act like real people to be seen as genuine. Therefore, it’s important to get to know your characters as much as possible to be able to portray them as genuine as possible. A great way to get to know your characters is to ask questions about them and answer as honestly as possible from their perspective. That’s why I’ve created a list of questions below. Use as many or as few as you want and get to know your characters more closely. Use the questions as you would in an interview. I personally find this easier to get into the heads of my characters.

Worldbuilding Questions to use When Outlining Your Story: 10 Questions to Consider

Worldbuilding Questions to use When Outlining Your Story: 10 Questions to Consider

No matter if you create a story within a real or fictional place, you need to know some things about your chosen place to create an as genuine setting for your story as possible. As a means of help you can use some of the questions below when developing your story. Write down the name of your chosen place at the top of a paper (physical or virtual) and use the questions below as a guide to explore your chosen place. Use them as a means to brainstorm, do research, or just to get inspiration.

The Basics of the Three Act Structure: Act III (the Ending)

The Basics of the Three Act Structure: Act III (the Ending)

The simplest building blocks of a story are found in the basic Three Act Structure (which can be used for both screenplay and novels). Act 1 is the beginning, Act 2 is the middle, and Act 3 is the ending. The components in the Three Act Structure are basically fundamental stages along the way of a story. To summarize the acts before I develop Act 3 and its components, I’ll say that:

Act 1 consists of the first quarter of the novel (or screenplay)

Act 2 consists of the next two quarters of the novel (or screenplay)

Act 3 consists of the final quarter of the novel (or screenplay)

How to Outline Your Book with ”What if” Questions: Use These 4 Steps

How to Outline Your Book with ”What if” Questions: Use These 4 Steps

Every story begins with an idea (an event, a scene, a character, a setting, a theme, etc.), and most ideas begin with a question and a sense of curiosity. Most of those questions start with ”What if…”.

”What if…” questions can vary in a million different ways. They can ask questions about the plot, scenes, characters, and everything else that constructs a story. There are no limits.

Perhaps not all stories begin with these ”what if…” questions articulated, however, most stories are ultimately inspired by questions like these.

The Basics of the Three Act Structure: Act II (the Middle)

The Basics of the Three Act Structure: Act II (the Middle)

The simplest building blocks of a story are found in the basic Three Act Structure (which can be used for both screenplay and novels). Act 1 is the beginning, Act 2 is the middle, and Act 3 is the ending. The components in the Three Act Structure are basically fundamental stages along the way of a story. To summarize the acts before I develop Act 2 and its components, I’ll say that:

Act 1 consists of the first quarter of the novel (or screenplay)

Act 2 consists of the next two quarters of the novel (or screenplay)

Act 3 consists of the final quarter of the novel (or screenplay)

Begin Crafting Your Book with Pre-Outline Questions: For Fiction and Non-Fiction

Begin Crafting Your Book with Pre-Outline Questions: For Fiction and Non-Fiction

When you create a story you usually begin with a general idea. Perhaps you have a certain character in mind, a specific setting (real or fictional), a conflict, a theme, etc. No matter what you start off with, that general idea needs to be developed. That’s where the pre-outline questions come in. Answering the pre-outline questions that follow will help you to establish what you want with your book, what you want your book to be, in some bigger strokes what kind of plot you want to have, what kind of characters you want to write about, etc. For those of you who write non-fiction, you will get to answer questions about your niche and develop ideas from that.

The Basics of the Three Act Structure: Act I (the Beginning)

The Basics of the Three Act Structure: Act I (the Beginning)

The simplest building blocks of a story are found in the basic Three Act Structure (which can be used for both screenplay and novels). Act 1 is the beginning, Act 2 is the middle, and Act 3 is the ending. The components in the Three Act Structure are basically fundamental stages along the way of a story. To summarize the acts before I develop Act 1 and its components, I’ll say that:

Act 1 consists of the first quarter of the novel (or screenplay)

Act 2 consists of the next two quarters of the novel (or screenplay)

Act 3 consists of the final quarter of the novel (or screenplay)

An Introduction to Outlining Your Story: 6 Reasons Why You Should

An Introduction to Outlining Your Story: 6 Reasons Why You Should

Outlining is a matter of debate among authors — both aspiring and professional. Some say it kills the creative experience and process of writing the story from start to finish, some say it’s a lifesaver. If you are new to writing and/or the concept of outlining, you might want to know what an outline is, why you should outline your story, and how?

Welcome to my Writing-Blog

There are lots of blogs out there on publishing and writing in general, several good ones with out-fleshed tips and loads of content and inspiration. But I thought there was room for one with quick and practical tips for the busy author, because we all know the author should do one thing above all else — write. But before I start blogging, I would like to tell you a little about myself. My name is Kylie Day; I’m 25 years old and live in Europe. I began planning this blog when I felt like I wanted to take my dream of publishing books more seriously. As long as I kept writing stories for myself I wouldn’t ever be an author, and figured I needed a kick in the backside. This blog will be my kick in the backside — a sort of constant reminder of what I really want with my life.

I read a lot about writing and publishing — as much as I read fiction — and believe this blog will be a kind of repository where I collect everything I learn through reading and during my own publishing process.

My own publishing process will begin with a series of non-fiction eBooks I’ve planned to publish on Amazon around the middle of this year. It is as much for me to make my dream come true as it is an experiment and a source of experience I want and need. During this process I will share everything on the blog to give you insight on what it’s like to publish your work.

I don’t know where this will lead, and I’m sure I will do a ton of mistakes along the way, but that’s a part of the learning process, isn’t it? And, you know what? It’s going to be fun.

 

Thank you for reading. If you have questions or feedback, feel free to comment in the field below.